Lazy S'S

 Farm Nursery

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Potentilla x cultorum 'Flamenco'

Potentilla x cultorum 'Flamenco'

Potentilla neumanniana 'Nana'

Potentilla neumanniana 'Nana'

Potentilla x hopwoodiana

Potentilla x hopwoodiana

Potentilla gracilis 'Pulchellum'

Potentilla gracilis 'Pulchellum'

Potentilla thurberi 'Monarch's Velvet'

 

 

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When to stop planting in the Fall.
Finding the Average Last Frost Date in Spring for each zone is easy for us to determine based on MUCH information on the Internet.  And that's when it's really safe to plant.   HOWEVER, determining the last safe planting dates in Fall is not nearly so easy to find and relies on more varied factors than in Spring, even dependable winter snow cover in your area makes a difference. 

The Customer must ultimately make this decision on when to stop planting in Fall.  If you order, we assume you've checked that it's still safe to plant in your area.  We truly cannot try to determine that for each area and each order and specific conditions where you might be going to plant (under an overhang, near a brick wall, etc.) -- it's much too local and too hard to find information for every town in the country!  There is no one reliable source for such things.  And occasionally when we notice that it's to late to plant and contact the customer, they're going to overwinter them in a greenhouse or sunroom!

Check with experienced gardeners, Extension Agents or GOOD Nurseries or Garden Centers in your area.

But here's some guidelines:

You will find different answers to this depending on where you look but in general, you should stop planting at least month before your ground freezes solid - or to make it simple, plant in Early to Mid Fall -- whatever that is for your area -- but not Late Fall.  In general, that corresponds with your first frost.  Often the first frost date is a reasonable last planting date.  The plants need at least a month to root in.  If they aren't rooted in well, they won't be able to take up moisture and they may get 'heaved' out of the ground during freezes and thaws. 

When is your average first Fall Frost?   Victory Seeds has a great page with links to each state so you can check.  The first frost date roughly is about the time you should stop planting -- about a month before the ground freezes solid.

Checking specific NOAA Freeze/Frost Records for you area are helpful in knowing average first fall frost dates.

We want you to be pleased with our plants and personally love Early to Mid Fall planting and do almost all of our planting then because we're too busy to plant in Spring.  But planting too late in the Fall is inviting trouble!  

If you use cold frames to over-winter plants, that can make a difference if you have expertise and a good set up.  Furthermore, folks with the best of intentions think they can over-winter plants inside.  Over-wintering inside rarely works unless you actually have a greenhouse AND then, plants that need a period of cold dormancy don't get it unless the greenhouse is kept very cold, which kind of defeats the purpose of a greenhouse.  

So, please plant in EARLY to MID-FALL -- it's a great time to plant.  We're not going to stop you from ordering but late Fall is probably not a good idea!

Happy Gardening,

Debby and Pete Sheuchenko

 

Actaea rubra f. leucocarpa

Actaea rubra f. leucocarpa

Spigelia marilandica

Spigelia marilandica

Geranium phaeum 'Raven'

Geranium phaeum 'Raven'

Echinacea purpurea 'Fragrant Angel' PP16054

Echinacea purpurea 'Fragrant Angel' PP16054

Peltoboykinia watanabei

Peltoboykinia watanabei

Helleborus x hybridus 'Sparkling Diamond'

Helleborus 'Sparkling Diamond'

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but please read the information on that page - it answers almost ALL questions!  :-)

Nursery for Sale      and       What that means to our customers :-)